Projects We’ve Funded

Project Heart’s Grant Disbursements

Dec 2016 – $30,000 Dr. Tom Doyle, Using a Stent to Replace Open-Heart Surgery

Dr. Tom Doyle and his colleagues, Dr. Dana Janssen and Dr. George Nicholson, are pediatric interventional cardiologists who have received funding from Project Heart. They have collaborated with Vivonics, a biomedical company in Boston, to develop a novel vascular stent designed to keep a vessel known as the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) open. Keeping the PDA open is often critical in providing blood flow to the lungs or body in children with congenital heart disease. This stent, placed in the cath lab, could be used in place of some open-heart surgery procedures in the future.

 

Sept 2017 – $25,000 Dr. Scott Baldwin, Building a Heart Valve in a “Dish”

Dr. Scott Baldwin’s laboratory focuses on understanding the basic principles of cardiac development to see if these same processes can be used to regenerate parts of the heart that are defective. His group is studying the origin of the cells that make heart valves, with the goal of ultimately using the patient’s own cells to grow a “valve in a dish” to replace the defective valve. Because the cells are the patient’s, they will be “alive” and grow with the patient. He is also studying how to regenerate blood vessels after heart injury.

 

Feb 2018 – $30,000 Dr. Jason Christensen, Lymphatic Imaging and Congenital Heart Disease

Dr. Jason Christensen is utilizing less invasive lymphatic imaging techniques currently used in cancer patients and applying similar methods to the field of pediatric cardiology. You may have heard your pediatrician comment on your child’s lymph nodes feeling bumpy or swollen when ill from the common cold or flu. Beyond this, you might not think of how the lymph system works dynamically. Lymph is the fluid surrounding every tissue in the body and originates from the liquid component of blood. It moves around the outside of every cell, helping absorb fat from the intestines and transporting infection fighting cells only to rejoin the blood as it returns to the heart. In children born with congenital heart disease (CHD), the large channels gathering lymph fluid can be develop abnormal connected to the lung or intestines, or be injured during a surgical operation. Rarely, abnormal lymph flow can be life-threatening. Noninvasive imaging of the lymph system is not routine because imaging methods need further development. With Project Heart’s support, we are applying novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital to map the lymph system in children with CHD and offer new strategies for the care of our patients

 

*Coming Soon* 2018 – $33,000 Addy’s Grant Fund